17 Good Signs You Got The Job After Your Interview

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

There are a number of signs that you'll get the job after an interview, but you need to pay attention if you want to notice them! Even the most obvious hints can slip past you in the heat of the moment. This guide will teach you how to know if you got the job, so you can stop worrying and start patting yourself on the back! Keep in mind, any of these promising signs could indicate a pending offer (or an invitation to another interview). However, the hiring process is unpredictable and things can change suddenly. For example, a better candidate may enter into the process, the hiring manager may change her mind about what she really needs, the company may have a budget freeze or one of a thousand other things could bump you out of the running...... Read more

Apply for a career aiding Veterans and their caregivers

By VAntage Point Contributor | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

We don't just serve those who have served at VA — we're also making it part of our mission to support the caregivers who are essential to their recovery. As caring for Veterans who need supervision or help with daily living can take a toll on their caregivers, we're hiring social workers, nurses, psychologists, legal professionals and others across the country to support our Caregiver Support Program (CSP). At the Elizabeth Dole Foundation's Sixth Annual National Convening on Oct. 29, VA Secretary Denis McDonough spoke about VA's efforts to prioritize caregivers. "I know that at times, throughout VA's history, caregivers have been overlooked," he said. "Or not included. Or not appreciated for the back-breaking work they do and the incredible service that they provide. But I'm here today to say, to any caregiver watching, that those... Read more

Starting A New Job: 16 Tips For What You Should Do

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Starting a new job on the right foot is key to your success, so it's important to take every step possible to make the right first impressions. It's normal to have some fear and anxiety when starting a new job. but you can reduce your fears when you have a plan in place for starting a new job. This article outlines tips and advice on how to start a new job successfully. Things To Do Before Starting A New Job. Preparing for a new job means you'll have to make some changes in your life and get things organized. Make sure you've taken care of these things. Confirm Start Date and Onboarding Schedule. Your offer letter may contain some of the important details. But it probably won't include the start time, location, who to ask for when you arrive...... Read more

Ten VA jobs that are open to the public right now

By VAntage Point Contributor | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

While we at VA often highlight career options for transitioning military personnel and Veterans, did you know that we also have a number of vacant positions that are open to the public? As long as you're a U.S. citizen, you can apply to jobs that are considered "open to the public." Anyone, including current federal employees or those eligible for a different hiring path, can apply to these jobs. Right now, over 3,000 vacant positions across VA are open to the public. Let's take a look at some of the jobs you can apply for to begin your VA career. 1. Chiropractors. A VA chiropractor makes adjustments to the body to restore joint and related soft tissue function. As with all of our treatments, this approach to health care is holistic, stressing the patient's overall well-being. You may combine your care with other forms of... Read more

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VA Outreach Coordinator - Sipley The Best - Orlando - FL
Government Account Representative - Carahsoft Technology Corporation - Reston - VA
School Bus Driver (Part-Time) - New Jersey Department of Children and Families - Totowa - NJ
Security Manager - Museum of the Shenandoah Valley - Winchester - VA
  • A Veteran's Guide to Transition: Active Duty to Government Service

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17 Good Signs You Got The Job After Your Interview

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

There are a number of signs that you'll get the job after an interview, but you need to pay attention if you want to notice them! Even the most obvious hints can slip past you in the heat of the moment.

This guide will teach you how to know if you got the job, so you can stop worrying and start patting yourself on the back!

Keep in mind, any of these promising signs could indicate a pending offer (or an invitation to another interview). However, the hiring process is unpredictable and things can change suddenly. For example, a better candidate may enter into the process, the hiring manager may change her mind about what she really needs, the company may have a budget freeze or one of a thousand other things could bump you out of the running.

Never put your job search on hold or back out of other interviews until you start your new job!

They Dig Into the Details

For the most part, interviewers do their best to stay as neutral as possible. There's a good chance you're talking to a hiring manager or human resources professional with countless interviews under their belt. For this open position alone, they've likely asked the same questions over and over to other applicants.

Because of this, interviewers often have stone-cold poker faces and usually stick to a script. The goal is to gather the necessary information to ensure that you're a good fit for the company.

So when they start to dig a little deeper into the finer details, take it as a good sign. We're not talking about grilling you for more information. We're referring to when an interviewer shows a genuine interest in what you have to say.

For example, they might ask for more details about one of your answers or a piece of job history and experience. Whatever the case may be, going "off-script" and asking you for more information shows that they like what they hear.

"When" vs. "If"

Sometimes, your interviewer can clue you in without even realizing it. Their thoughts can manifest in their word choice.

Pay attention to how they're wording questions and statements. When that "if" turns into a "when," it's a great sign that you'll get the job after the interview.

Generally, interviewers like to use conditional language. For example, you'll hear a lot of, "If you get the job, this will happen," or "The person in this position would do this."

It's a way to keep things neutral and avoid showing too much of their cards.

In some cases, interviewers will unintentionally shift their language. Suddenly, it's "When you get hired, you'll work here," or "This is what we expect from you when you start."

It's a subtle change, but those words are a fantastic sign.

They Take You on a Tour

Hiring managers don't give tours to every applicant. Workplace tours can be quite time-consuming. While they are a good idea, touring every candidate isn't always practical.

If an interviewer offers to show you around, it's a promising sign that you got the job.

Office tours can sometimes be awkward. It certainly puts you on the spot and makes everyone stop what they're doing to see who you are. But remember, this is a good thing!

Casual Conversation

Here's another subtle shift in the conversation that can give a lot away about the interviewer's line of thinking.

Most often, job interviews are about business and nothing more. Sure, they may want to understand if you are a fit for the culture and team, but the first priority is to determine if you're suited for a job. Making friends during the interview isn't a top priority (no matter what the company culture is).

So, what does it mean when the interviewer veers off-topic, and you start having a more casual conversation?

Generally, that means that the interviewer already has the information they need to know. This is a good sign that you'll get the job because they're likely satisfied with what you can bring to the table. Now, they're interested in getting to know you a little more as a person.

Perks & Benefits Are Discussed

It's important to remember that hiring managers perform job interviews to gauge whether or not you can sufficiently fill the open role. Certain companies and certain recruiters do try to provide you with information you'll likely be interested in knowing, like perks and benefits. But this is still pretty rare.

In addition to turning the conversation casual, your interviewer might start to bring up perks and benefits. It's a critical conversational shift to listen for in the interview room.

Why?

This indicates that the interview has gone from determining your potential to highlighting all the good the company has to offer. Essentially, they've moved on to selling you on the organization and how great the position is.

Typically, discussions about benefits happen later. If they occur during the interview, it's a great sign that you will receive a job offer.

You're Asked About Your Availability & Timeline

Your general availability and potential work schedule are details that should come later on in the hiring process. In most instances, you don't cover those details until you're on the cusp of getting an offer. Some companies don't even talk about it until you start filling out paperwork and onboarding.

But even though interviewers typically don't deal with those aspects, they may bring those details up if they see you as a top candidate that they want on the team.

More important than your general availability is your transition timeline. When a hiring manager asks when you can start and how long it'll take for you to transition into the company, consider it a very good sign that you will get the job. If they present a timeline and ask you if you can meet it, that's even better!

Good Body Language

Paying attention to someone's body language can provide valuable insight into what's going on in their head. Use that to your advantage during an interview situation.

Even hiring managers trying to play things cool may give away their thoughts in their physical movements.

Some interviewers are required to go through a script of questions for multiple candidates. Don't be surprised if they seem a little bored or rigid. This ensures that every candidate has the same experience.

But if you see your interviewer giving off subtle hints of enthusiasm, that's a sign you might get the job. They might lean in when they speak to you, make eye contact, and even nod along to the things you say. A general attentive posture and responsive body language show that they like what they hear.

The Interview Runs Long

If an interview feels like it's running a bit long, it might signify that things are going well.

Hiring managers have to get through several interviews for a single open position. Interviewers usually like to set aside a specific amount of time for each applicant to stay organized and on schedule.

It's typically a good thing when your interviewer takes up most of the allotted time or goes over. It means that they are interested in what you have to offer and want to spend as much time getting to know you as possible.

No one wants to waste anyone's time, so hiring managers often cut interviews short if they can tell you're not a good fit. The longer an interview is, the better!

Now, it's important to remember that every interviewer is different. It all comes down to context. Some might spend more time with you repeating and rephrasing questions because you're not clear enough.

Learn to read their body language and use some of the other signs to determine if your longer interview was a good or bad thing.

You're Asked to Meet the Team

This indicator is similar to getting an office tour. No matter how awkward it can be to get shuffled around meeting various team members and decision-makers, it's a very good sign that you'll get the job after your interview.

It's not practical to meet everyone if you're not getting the job and won't work with them.

Meet and greets can serve a couple of different purposes. It might mean that the hiring manager is excited to welcome you to the company, so they show you who you'll be working with to ease the transition. Alternatively, they can use the opportunity to get second opinions or reinforcements about the decision they've already made.

The latter purpose is more common if you meet higher-ups. Take advantage of the opportunity! It's never a bad thing meeting people who can have an impact on the trajectory of your career.

Salary Expectation are Covered

If you reach the point of discussing compensation, it might mean that the interviewer is eager to move to the next phase of bringing you into the team.

Now it's worth pointing out that this isn't always the case. It's not uncommon to hear some questions about salary expectations. After all, those points could be on the list of things they ask all applicants.

But when there's a little back-and-forth about salary expectations, it's usually a positive sign that you will receive a job offer. Salary negotiations don't happen as part of the initial interview. That's an entirely different part of the process in most cases.

Discussing pay and benefits in detail might mean that the interviewer is trying to better understand the type of package you'll accept when they officially extend an offer.

If It Sounds Like They're Trying to Sell You on the Company

Earlier, we mentioned that bringing up perks and benefits is a way to make the company look good. That conversation might go beyond simple statements about compensation.

Your interviewer might dive deep into matters like work culture. If they've been there for a long time, the hiring manager might even start to tell you about their story and how they've progressed to be in the position they are now. They could even talk about other employees and how they've succeeded.

Either way, hearing your interviewer highlight the positive aspects of the company is always a good thing.

When it sounds like they're selling you on the company, they're trying to convince you to accept a job offer before they even make it!

You're Asked About Your Impressions of the Company

Sometimes, interviewers will outright ask you about your thoughts on the open position or the company itself (this might come up before or after the classic: "Do you have any questions for me?").

For the most part, the goal of job interviews is to highlight your skills and prove why you are the perfect person to fill an open role. That said, it goes both ways. You have the chance to learn more about the company and determine if it's a job you want to have.

Towards the end of the interview, the hiring manager might ask what you think. Once again, this is a potential sign that you'll get the job after your interview.

The question isn't a ploy or a trick. The hiring manager genuinely wants to know what you think because it allows them to address concerns and answer questions. Essentially, it's another way to sell the company.

By answering your questions and overcoming your objectives, they can help you feel comfortable accepting an offer when it comes.

The Interviewer Says How Impressed They Are

Not every interviewer will beat around the bush or be intentionally vague. It all depends on the situation. Some hiring managers are very forthright and transparent.

If you're lucky enough to hear an interviewer say that they're impressed with what you have to offer, it's a pretty clear sign that you got the job! You should feel good about what you've done!

Obviously, there are no guarantees, but interviewers don't just say that to everyone. They're not there to waste time or toy with someone's emotions. It serves no one to lie to you, so you can take those types of statements at face value and pat yourself on the back when you leave the interview room.

Your References are Contacted

Contacting references is an integral part of the hiring process, but it's not something that hiring managers do unless they're seriously considering bringing you on. Again, it's about being efficient and not wasting anyone's time.

Why would they contact a reference of someone they're not interested in hiring?

Make sure you provide good contact and give them a heads up that a hiring manager might get in touch with them. Some companies don't even ask for references unless they intend on contacting them. That may come towards the end of the interview, so have some printed numbers ready just in case.

You're Given Direct Contact Information

Getting direct contact information is always a good sign you'll get the job after the interview. Hiring managers meet potential applicants all the time and usually avoid handing out business cards like candy.

If this happens, there's a good chance that the hiring manager sees something special in you. It shows that they want to keep you engaged. That could mean that they're interested in hiring you for this position, or they might have something else in mind for you within the company.

Either way, direct contact information is a huge deal. They're giving you a line to reach them without having to go through a gatekeeper. It could even mean that they want you to reach out and ensure that the rest of the hiring process goes smoothly.

They Go Out of Their Way to Mention the Follow-Up Process

Many companies these days have a multi-step hiring process. It's not enough to pass an interview with flying colors. While that's undoubtedly one of the biggest hurdles to get past, you might have to complete other steps before getting an official offer.

They might tell you when to expect a call, or they could give you some insight into what happens next.

For example, you could have additional interviews with other higher-ups in the company. Some organizations also have skills tests to gauge your abilities.

If the hiring manager talks about any of that, they're likely preparing you for what's to come.

You Get a Prompt Response to Your Thank You Email

Hopefully, you don't forget to send a thank you email after the interview. It's job interview 101!

Now, most hiring managers can't respond to every single email they get from applicants. It's nothing personal! In most cases, a failure to respond has more to do with a lack of time than anything else.

That said, people responsible for hiring new employees understand the importance of staying in contact with compelling applicants. They don't want to lose you to another company, so they'll go out of their way to keep the lines of communication open.

If you receive a quick and positive response from the thank you email, pat yourself on the back! While there are no guarantees, a quick response is a good sign that you got the job.

Wrapping Up

There are plenty of signs that you got the job after an interview, and catching them is up to you! Some are more subtle than others, but being able to recognize them can save you a lot of unnecessary stress while you wait!

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Apply for a career aiding Veterans and their caregivers

By VAntage Point Contributor | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

We don't just serve those who have served at VA — we're also making it part of our mission to support the caregivers who are essential to their recovery.

As caring for Veterans who need supervision or help with daily living can take a toll on their caregivers, we're hiring social workers, nurses, psychologists, legal professionals and others across the country to support our Caregiver Support Program (CSP).

At the Elizabeth Dole Foundation's Sixth Annual National Convening on Oct. 29, VA Secretary Denis McDonough spoke about VA's efforts to prioritize caregivers.

"I know that at times, throughout VA's history, caregivers have been overlooked," he said. "Or not included. Or not appreciated for the back-breaking work they do and the incredible service that they provide. But I'm here today to say, to any caregiver watching, that those days are over. Let me repeat: those days are over."

Ease the burden

CSP is designed to relieve some of the stress of full-time caregiving responsibilities. The program offers help with the myriad of issues that caregivers face, such as understanding diagnoses, providing palliative care, managing stress and communicating personal needs.

Working with CSP, you can help manage and provide the resources these caregivers so desperately need. In this role, you might:

  • Work directly with caregivers and Veterans to identify and assess caregiver stress/burden
  • Conduct home visits to Veterans and caregivers receiving VA support
  • Advise and collaborate with interdisciplinary teams throughout the medical center on caregiver issues
  • Create and distribute educational tools, develop programs and implement training focused on specific caregiver needs/issues
  • Develop and facilitate caregiver support groups and educational programs

To be a part of our program to support caregivers, apply to the hundreds of available positions for social workers, nurses and other professionals.

Enjoy our benefits

Beyond the chance to support our nation's heroes and the caregivers that help them daily, a VA career offers numerous rewards.

We provide generous benefits, such as competitive pay, high-quality insurance plans, educational benefits like student loan forgiveness, and the ability to enroll in the Federal Employees Retirement System. You'll also receive 11 paid federal holidays, 13 sick days, and 13 to 26 days of paid annual leave.

Because VA is the largest health care system in the country, you can work in a variety of care settings anywhere in the country — including at the beach, in a big city or in a rural area.

Work at VA

Help us help Veterans and their caregivers by applying now.

NOTE: Positions listed in this post were open at the time of publication. All current available positions are listed at USAJobs.gov.

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Starting A New Job: 16 Tips For What You Should Do

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Starting a new job on the right foot is key to your success, so it's important to take every step possible to make the right first impressions.

It's normal to have some fear and anxiety when starting a new job. but you can reduce your fears when you have a plan in place for starting a new job. This article outlines tips and advice on how to start a new job successfully.

Things To Do Before Starting A New Job

Preparing for a new job means you'll have to make some changes in your life and get things organized. Make sure you've taken care of these things.

Confirm Start Date and Onboarding Schedule

Your offer letter may contain some of the important details. But it probably won't include the start time, location, who to ask for when you arrive and other information you'll need during your first days on the job.

Some organizations may have a rigorous onboarding program, in other organizations, your orientation into a new job and company may be less formal.

If you haven't been provided with all the information you need for your first day on the job, you should ask for the information. You want to be as prepared as possible for your big day.

Research Your Team and Manager

Before you step foot in the office or start virtually, research your manager, the team, and leadership. You want to look for things you have in common and that you can reference to help build your connection and working relationship.

You also want to research what the employees have in common with each other — did some of them work at the same company before or attend the same college?

When you research the backgrounds of people at your new job, it may give you some insight into how work gets done, how things are communicated, and what people like.

Return All HR/Payroll Paperwork

When starting a new job, you will be required to complete paperwork for HR. Return the completed information/forms as soon as possible. This shows you are responsive and sets the right first impression.

Prepare For Your New Work Schedule

It's time to get back into the work routine. And while you don't know exactly what that will look like with your new employer, you do know that you'll have less personal time.

From scheduling to food prep to clothing, make sure you have everything organized for the first week at your new job. The more preparation you do in advance, the less stressed you will be.

Next comes your first days on the job. Follow these 8 tips for starting a new job.

Your First 90 Days In A New Job

The first 90 days of a new job are important. You want to make the best first impression with everyone you meet. You also want to position yourself for success. Here's what you can do during your first 90 days.

Ask your new manager for a meeting

When starting a new job, it's important to make sure you and your boss are on the same page. Even if you've already discussed expectations during the interview, now that you are an employee, It's time to revisit the topic.

During this meeting, ask what your boss's expectations are for you and the job.

  • How will my performance be evaluated?
  • How do you define success in this role?
  • What do you expect me to accomplish in my first 90 days?
  • What is the best way for us to communicate?
  • What qualities and traits do you respect most from your employees?
  • Who are some of the key people here you think I should meet?

Plus any other questions to help you feel you know how to be successful in your new job

Your purpose for asking these questions is to understand your manager's expectations and how you can best manage those expectations.

This first meeting sets the tone for how you'll communicate and work with your new manager. It shows you are thoughtful and interested in creating a partnership. If you continue to have an open dialogue with your manager, it will alleviate confusion, frustration, and misunderstandings.

Create your 90 day plan

Based on the information gathered during the interview process and conversations with your new manager, create your plan for how you will acclimate to your new job for the next 90 days.

Why?

Having a plan will help you feel more in control and give you a sense of satisfaction as you check items off your list. It also provides measurable results you can share with your new manager.

Some companies have very good onboarding procedures. Other companies do not. By developing a plan for starting your new job, you'll combine what the company thinks you need with what YOU think you need to come up to speed quickly in your new job.

Here's a rough outline of what to address when creating your plan for your first 90 days:

30-Day Plan: During the first 30 days in your new job, time is spent attending training, meeting team members, learning the organization's systems and its products and services, reviewing procedures and client accounts. Address how you will achieve these goals.

60-Day Plan: During the first 60 days, you'll be meeting with your supervisor to gather feedback, building relationships with your colleagues, identifying potential mentors, learning about company processes and procedures, visiting other departments, studying best practices in the industry, and continuing to attend training.

90-Day Plan: The later part of your first 90 days requires you to begin putting your learning into action. Depending on your role, that could mean actually producing work. Set your goals for implementing new strategies and procedures, new initiatives, and/or communication plans, marketing plans, operations plans.

Observe and learn from co-workers

There's often a pretty big learning curve when starting a new job and one of the best ways to tackle this is by asking questions and listening to people you work with.

Ask lots of questions about processes, procedures, and why they do things the way they do so you understand the history.

You'll also want to take note of who knows who, what employees are saying in the break room, and how they behave in front of managers and leaders.

When you are new in a job, it helps to understand company culture so you can adapt and fit in.

Be open to new ways of doing things

As you learn and listen, you will likely want to share what you know or better ways of doing things. Do not say anything yet. You should wait until you are asked for input or ideas before trying to help.

You don't want to come across as a know-it-all or as someone who doesn't listen. There is plenty of time for you to voice your opinions and ideas. Maybe, just maybe, their way of doing things works well for their culture and company.

Figure out what you want to be known for

You have a clean slate as you start a new job. Consider how you want to be perceived by your new manager, co-workers, support staff and leadership.

What is the "personal brand" you want to bring into this new organization?

And by the way, you'll be asked many times to introduce yourself.

Have a 45-second response ready when asked to introduce yourself. The best way to concisely answer this question is to provide a very high-level overview of how your past roles have prepared you for this job, two or three of your top strengths, and what you're looking forward to in your new role/company.

Develop your internal career goals

Where do you see yourself in 1 year and what do you need to get there? Part of your internal career plan will include meeting people throughout the company and at all levels.

Be realistic about your goals and expectations.

Keep a running list of accomplishments from your new job

Creating a record of your achievements and accomplishments will help you have better conversations with your manager, especially during performance reviews.

Your list of accomplishments may be used internally as well as externally. Consider adding them to your resume and LinkedIn profile.

A simple notepad with three columns will do. Just be sure you update it regularly and have access to it if you are laid off.

Actions: List the actions you plan to take to achieve your goal

Success: Determine how you will measure your achievement on this action item

Target Date: Commit to a completion date

Identify professional development opportunities

In the early days of starting a new job, there's a lot to learn.

Once you're up to speed, continue to look for opportunities to grow. It doesn't matter whether you pursue internal courses, external classes, membership in or a leadership role in professional organizations. You'll want to stay up to date (and marketable) by keeping an eye on what trends and tools are being used outside your current organization.

It's also a good time to look for mentors. It doesn't need to be a formal or long-term commitment, nor do you need to call it a mentorship. It simply means that you have permission/agreement from someone to ask for their advice and insight. You want to learn what they know. And they are agreeable to sharing this information with you.

Wrapping Up Your Job Search

Your job search has taught you a lot of things. One of which is to never stop looking for your next opportunity. You realize how time-consuming it has been to engage your network. It's much easier to maintain connections rather than build them from scratch. And believe me, you will be looking for a new job in the future. So here are some things you should do after you've started your new job.

Add Your New Job To LinkedIn

Once you've gotten a feel for your new job it's time to update your LinkedIn profile. Add your new job title, company, and an overview of what you expect to accomplish or the assignments you'll be working on.

If you want to celebrate your new job, take it one step further and post a status update on LinkedIn announcing your new job. Be sure to thank people in your network for their support and offer to help others who may need it.

Create time to continue to network

How will you keep in touch with all the people you've met over the past several months? How will you meet new people associated with your new role inside and outside your new company? What professional associations will you join?

All these questions point to the fact that you need to build time into your schedule to stay in touch and meet new people.

11. Inform recruiters of your new status

As tempting as it may be to cut all ties with recruiters you've met, don't. Instead, let them know what new title you would be looking for and your new salary requirements.

If you ever have the chance, refer a great coworker or colleague to a recruiter who is trying to fill a job. Referrals are powerful and recruiters appreciate them. Just make sure the referral is relevant to the types of roles the recruiter is trying to fill.

If there are other jobs you are still in the running for, carefully consider whether you should continue the process or inform them that you have taken a new role. Just because you recently started a new job doesn't mean you can't interview for another job.

Share your success story with your network.

Fellow job seekers want to know there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Your friends want to hear the good news and celebrate with you! Be sure to notify everyone you contacted during your job search and thank them for their support, no matter how small.

Closing the loop shows your compassion for them. It's a wonderful way to pay it forward and set the right example.

Reminders When Starting A New Job

Consider this a list of to-dos when starting your new job:

  • Keep your boss informed
  • Listen more than talk
  • Establish a good attendance and performance record
  • Learn and remember names
  • Ask questions/ask for help
  • Be prepared for meetings
  • Don't try to change things (unless asked to)

Focus On Your Career Momentum

  • Set professional development goals
  • Track of your accomplishments
  • Attend professional association meetings
  • Maintain contact with connections outside of work
  • Find a mentor/be a mentor
  • Grow your network

Conclusion

When preparing for a new job, it's important to map out a plan and take initiative to get what you need to be successful. You also want to be intentional about every action you take and ensure it represents you positively.

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Ten VA jobs that are open to the public right now

By VAntage Point Contributor | U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs © 2022, Reprinted with permission

While we at VA often highlight career options for transitioning military personnel and Veterans, did you know that we also have a number of vacant positions that are open to the public?

As long as you're a U.S. citizen, you can apply to jobs that are considered "open to the public." Anyone, including current federal employees or those eligible for a different hiring path, can apply to these jobs.

Right now, over 3,000 vacant positions across VA are open to the public. Let's take a look at some of the jobs you can apply for to begin your VA career.

Chiropractors

A VA chiropractor makes adjustments to the body to restore joint and related soft tissue function. As with all of our treatments, this approach to health care is holistic, stressing the patient's overall well-being. You may combine your care with other forms of treatment depending on the patient's specific needs.

Dermatologists

Our dermatologists meet with and treat Veterans in a variety of settings, including outpatient clinics. In addition to performing minor procedures, you'll also answer patient questions and educate Veterans and their caregivers about different treatments and therapies.

Medical Records Technicians

Responsible for the overall quality and completeness of clinical documentation, medical records technicians are skilled in classifying data from patient health records in our medical centers and care facilities. A core aspect of this job is examining patient records with an eye toward improving documentation processes.

Medical Support Assistants

Medical support assistants are tasked with receiving and indexing health and administrative information. They use a variety of data systems to schedule patients for appointments, including interpreting and verifying provider orders in accordance with our scheduling guidelines.

Nurses

One of several positions with a regular, ongoing need is that of nurses, who play a crucial role in Veterans' long-term, holistic health. You'll collaborate across disciplines and treatment settings with medical teams and other community resources to help coordinate the full spectrum of patient care.

Optometrists

At VA, an optometrist oversees clinical eye exams and may prescribe optical or electronic devices to help Veterans. As a trained eye care specialist, you may also perform diagnostic, therapeutic and rehabilitative procedures to manage vision problems and performance.

Physicians

Physicians of all disciplines are a long-term need at VA, with countless positions open across our more than 1,200 facilities. Our variety of care environments, research prospects and educational support gives you limitless room to grow and advance in your career.

Police Officer

If you want to help Veterans but don't have health care experience, you may be interested in a VA law enforcement career. VA police officers have varied duties that benefit not only Veterans but also the communities they live in, serving as an active federal police force in and around our facilities.

Psychologists

At VA, we understand the unique challenges Veterans face when returning home and transitioning back to civilian life. Our staff psychologists expertly tailor treatment plans that meet patients where they are, ease their symptoms and help them achieve wholeness.

Social workers

Social work at VA focuses on recovery, coordinating care that empowers Veterans and their families to take charge of their well-being and pursue fuller lives. From counseling and emergency services to telemedicine, our social workers do what it takes to help Veterans reclaim their mental and emotional freedom.

Which jobs are open to the public?

When you begin your search on USA Jobs, select the "Open to the public" filter. Your results will display all available jobs.

You can also look inside each individual job announcement. In the "This job is open to..." section, you'll find that a job open to the public will display the "public" icon, which looks like three small figures in white against a circle of blue.

Work at VA

All these roles, and others like them, are important to VA and the Veterans we serve. Browse these job listings and more as your first step toward a career at VA.

NOTE: Positions listed in this post were open at the time of publication. All current available positions are listed at USAJobs.gov.

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