How To Write A Letter Of Interest + Effective Samples

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

What do you do when there's a company you'd love to work for but they don't have any openings available? You could wait until one is posted and then be one of over 250 candidates that apply. Or you could proactively reach out and pitch yourself. Pitching yourself may feel outside of your comfort zone, but I'm going to lay it all out here and teach you how to write a letter of interest that will get you noticed. What Is A Letter Of Interest? A letter of interest is written by a job seeker when they are interested in working for a company that does not appear to have any job opportunities listed. Rather than simply sending your resume into their applicant tracking system and hoping the company will search for someone with your...... Read more

New "Ask VA" portal allows anyone to contact VA securely

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

Do you want to find more information on VA benefits and services? Do you have a question, concern, recommendation, or compliment for VA? Then use the new "Ask VA" portal! What is Ask VA? The Ask VA online question portal, launched on October 18, 2021, was created to provide the Veteran community with an easier, faster and more convenient way to get their questions answered. It replaces VA's outdated Inquiry Routing & Information System (IRIS) and the GI Bill Help Portal. Who Can Access Ask VA? Anyone can access Ask VA to submit a question at any time. Veterans, their families, caregivers, beneficiaries, dependents, or the general public can use Ask VA for specific or broad information on VA benefits and services. Veterans do not have to be enrolled in VA to submit a question. In fact, Ask VA can provide helpful... Read more

Thank You Email After Job Interview: Tips & Best Samples

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Is sending a thank you email after a job interview required? No. However, sending one will absolutely help you stand out or be remembered. In order to construct a thank you message that is meaningful and professional, you'll want to follow some basic guidelines and see some examples. That's what you'll find in this guide. Why You Should Send One. A thank you email after an interview makes a positive impression on hiring decision makers. Here's data to help you understand just how much a thank you note means. 68% of recruiters/hiring managers say a thank you email after the interview matters (Talent Inc.) And there's another reason to write a thank you after your interview. It's the polite thing to do. Sending someone a thank you may not...... Read more

Win the job search race with these 4 effective habits

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

A job search is like a marathon. And just like a runner in training, you need to develop a regimen, building new habits to help you toward your goal. Whether you're transitioning out of the military to your first civilian career or hunting for a new challenge, finding a new job — and the right job — is a long-term investment of your time and talent. Know what you're looking for. Runners set goals, even if it's just finishing the race with a personal best time. The way you search for a job should be no different. When applying for jobs, it's tempting to apply for any and every job you can find, just throwing your resume out there and hoping something sticks. Instead, focus on the jobs that you really want, the roles that fill you...... Read more

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How To Write A Letter Of Interest + Effective Samples

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

What do you do when there's a company you'd love to work for but they don't have any openings available?

You could wait until one is posted and then be one of over 250 candidates that apply. Or you could proactively reach out and pitch yourself.

Pitching yourself may feel outside of your comfort zone, but I'm going to lay it all out here and teach you how to write a letter of interest that will get you noticed.

Table of contents

 

What Is A Letter Of Interest?

A letter of interest is written by a job seeker when they are interested in working for a company that does not appear to have any job opportunities listed.

Rather than simply sending your resume into their applicant tracking system and hoping the company will search for someone with your qualifications, you can take initiative and email a letter of interest that will entice someone to consider hiring you today.

For example, let's say you've heard great things about a company and really want to work there. After reviewing jobs listed on their website's career page you don't see any openings. What do you do?

Instead of waiting for the right job to be posted, why not write a letter of interest? In your letter you would explain why you are interested in the company and why you think they should hire you (or at least call you for a conversation).

By writing a letter of interest, also known as an interest letter or a prospecting letter, you bring attention to your qualifications, hoping that the person you send it to will be interested in learning more about you.

Will a letter of interest work? It is my belief that good managers are always looking for their next great hire. This could be you.

Does this sound bold? Risky? Out of your comfort zone? Then this is exactly why you should try this approach. Waiting around for a job to be posted may result in you missing out on an opportunity.

Since you aren't responding to a posted job opening, the person receiving your interest letter isn't overwhelmed by managing hundreds of resumes, inquiries and interviews.

Taking this bold move helps you get noticed. It's also something most job seekers will never do which gives you an advantage. Taking this initiative shows your spunk and an increased level of interest in working for a company. Both of these are qualities hiring managers appreciate.

A letter of interest can be sent at any time, there does not need to be an opening or posted job opportunity.

It may sound similar to a cover letter and it does follow a similar layout and formula, however, there isn't a posted job so you don't know the exact requirements the decision maker is looking for. You'll have to use your research to identify the skills you believe they would be most interested in. You can also include transferable skills you know are needed.

Here's what you need to know about writing a letter of interest.

How To Write A Letter Of Interest

There's no need to wait for a job to be advertised. It's possible that one of the companies you are interested in needs you right now, but hasn't posted a job yet.

The key to writing a strong and compelling letter of interest is to show the company how they will benefit from adding you to their team. This means you need to understand what the company needs and to do that you'll need to conduct research.

If you aren't willing to do this type of digging, there are also many others who won't do it either. Even fewer will take the time to write a letter of interest. That's the benefit of writing one.

This is what you'll need to do in order to write a letter of interest.

Research The Company

I'm a big advocate of research. The more you know about a company, the more compelling your letter of interest is going to be. That's why it's worth your time and effort to learn as much as you can about the company. So here's what to do.

Go to the company's website, LinkedIn page and run a general internet search to see what news and information is available about the company. Look for information such as:

  • Has the company been in the news recently?
  • What are the company's mission and values
  • Who are their top competitors?
  • Are there any reviews from employees about working for this company?
  • What are the challenges their industry faces right now?
  • What's the company culture like?
  • Who makes the hiring decisions for the area you are interested in?
Read Press Releases

What is happening at the company? Are they expanding, shrinking, or merging? Have they just released a new product or service? Are they letting go of office space? As you learn about what's happening in the company, think about how your previous experience in any of those areas can benefit the company.

Monitor Their Social Media

By checking out their social media channels you may learn about events they are hosting, news they are sharing about the company, or see videos and/or photos of employees. This may also give you a feel for the company's culture and values.

Track Competitors' Activities

When you research the company's competitors, you may notice trends. These trends are also likely to happen within the company you are targeting. Knowing about the competition helps you predict what may be coming next or what changes need to be made.

Talk To Employees (Current and Past)

Before putting your energy into writing a letter of interest, make sure you want to work there. The best way to uncover this information is by speaking with current and former employees. Ask them what they like about working there and what they don't like.

As a last resort, you could look at the company's reviews on Glassdoor. But that often doesn't provide the same quality of information.

In your conversations you may also learn about technology they use, goals for growth or plans for change. All of this could be useful when writing your letter of interest.

Address The Letter To The Right Decision Maker

The right decision maker is the person inside the company with the authority to hire you. That's not Human Resources or a recruiter, unless you want to work in those departments. It could be the person who heads up the department you want to work in or it could be a senior officer in the company. Use LinkedIn or the company website to identify the name and title of the person you would report into.

When writing your letter of interest, you must address it to a specific person so it reaches the right person and shows you've done your research.

Finding the name of the right person is also important because you will probably email your letter of interest.

Write A Great Subject Line

Sending your letter of interest as an email is the fastest and most efficient way to deliver it. When sending any email, it's critical to use a subject line that gets the manager's attention. Imagine how many emails someone gets at work during the day — hundreds, if not thousands. It's the subject line that will compel the reader to open your message.

Be Concise And Professional

People are busy and don't read every email. That's why it's important that your interest letter be short, professional and to the point. You want it to catch their attention, not necessarily answer every question they may have. Here are some reminders:

  • Use formal business language.
  • Write shorter paragraphs and consider using bullets instead of sentences.
  • Always double and triple check your work for spelling and grammatical errors.
Ask For A Conversation

At the end of your letter, you will ask the reader to accept your invitation for a phone call. Just to be clear, this call is an information gathering conversation, not a job interview. The purpose of your call is to learn more about the inner workings of the department, to ask about the skills and knowledge they value, and to ask what their future hiring plans are.

The decision maker inside the company is also interested in learning more about your background and skills to assess whether there is a potential fit within his or her team.

Always Follow Up

In order for that conversation to happen, you must ask for one. You will also want to follow up at least a couple of times after you send the letter to see if they had a chance to read it and ask if they would be available for a brief conversation.

Don't Include A Resume

Instead of attaching your resume, a better option is to include a link to your LinkedIn profile which provides a thorough overview of your experience and all your achievements. Since there isn't a job available, it would be difficult for you to customize your resume to address the unique requirements of the job.

If you attach a link to your LinkedIn profile, you can see if the hiring manager or someone from the company has looked at your profile.

Now that you understand some of the basics of the letter, let's look at how to format your letter of interest.

Formatting Your Letter

Your letter of interest is considered business correspondence, it's not a casual text message. You want to use appropriate formatting and wording to get the reader's attention fast and show your professionalism.

While we call this a letter, it's more likely that you would send it as an email. The content of your letter becomes the body of the email.

Of course you could still mail your letter and due to the low volume of mail, your letter may have a greater chance of getting noticed than your email message.

People are too busy to open attachments. Don't include your letter of interest as an attachment to your email. Instead, include your letter in the body of your email.

Use this format to address your letter of interest.

When Writing A Physical Letter

If you were actually to mail a letter, then use a formal business letter format. Here's what the top of the letter would look like:

Header (formatted like the header of your resume):

Your Name
Your Address
City, ST Zip
Phone number
Email
LinkedIn URL

Date




Mr./Ms. First Name Last Name of recipient
Job Title
Company Name
Company Mailing Address
City, ST Zip

If you are emailing your letter, you do not need to include all this information. However, you will need the person's email address.

You can use one of these free tools to look up an email address with a high degree of certainty.

When Writing An Email

When emailing the hiring decision maker, craft an interesting subject line. Something other than "I want to work for your company."

Here are some examples of subject lines you can adapt:

  • Subject: Do you need your next project manager to use Agile methodology?
  • Subject: Is analyzing customer data something you need help with?
  • Subject: Why wait to streamline your operations?

Then start your email using a formal introduction:

Dear Mr./Ms Last Name:

Opening Paragraph — Hook Them

In your first paragraph, you have seconds to capture the reader's attention. There are several ways to do this. You could:

  • Include the reason you are interested in the company and want to work there
  • Mention a fact about the company and why that's important to you
  • Highlight an accomplishment you know would benefit them

If you choose to explain why you are interested in working for the company, make it specific. You could mention that you've seen news about their growth, that they won an award for being a desirable place to work, you are a fan of their product or service, or you have friends who love working there.

Another option is to align your personal interests or values with those of the company you are writing. Mission-based companies appreciate people whose values align with their own. So if you have a passion for social justice, rescuing animals or something that aligns with the company, be sure to mention that.

The third option is to address how you will benefit the company. List one of your accomplishments in one of these areas that aligns with what the company may need:

  • Save or make more money
  • Expand the business
  • Increase the customer base
  • Solve a problem
  • Improve processes, systems or operations (or the way things are being done)
  • Respond to a problem in the community
  • Capitalize on, or respond to, a trend

Next, since there isn't a job available, you want to let the reader know what roles you are best suited for. You need to provide some area of focus so they can initially categorize you. Don't expect the reader to be a career match-maker.

Qualifications Paragraph

Once you entice the reader by explaining why you are interested in their company, your next paragraph explains how your experience, education and skills will make you a strong potential match, help fill gaps or in some other way benefit the company. This paragraph can be a bulleted list or short sentences.

Since this is a short letter, you only have time to mention qualifications that are directly relevant and important to the company.

Use accomplishments that spell out what you did and the quantifiable outcomes. For example:

  • By analyzing customer data, improved ROI by 25%
  • Reduced collection period from 65 days to 34 days
  • Developed new industry relationships and closed 110% of sales quota

Remember, your ultimate goal is to convince the reader to agree to a conversation with you, or perhaps even pick up the phone and call you.

Closing Paragraph

In this final paragraph, you want to let the reader know what to do or what will happen next. If you are determined to get a response, then the best course of action is to state that you will be following up with them. But always include your contact information at the bottom of your email, just in case.

Samples And Templates

Starting from scratch can be difficult, so the letter of interest samples below will give you some ideas on how to structure your own letter.

Sample 1

Dear Mr. Jones:

I read an article recently in Marketing Magazine Online about Acme's innovative approach to digital marketing. You were quoted as saying "We are dedicated to building relationships with our customers, not just taking their money." This is so refreshing to hear and compelled me to reach out.

I am a Content Planner and Analyst and have over five years of experience analyzing the ROI of our digital marketing efforts. Through my analysis, we were able to improve ROI by 25%, a notable achievement in this area. A key component of my analysis involved looking at the long-term and recurring engagements of customers. My deep understanding in this area is something I think you and Acme would be interested in as it's the core of building relationships.

If you think my expertise in analyzing engagement, customer relationship building and ROI would be a benefit to Acme, I'd be open to having a conversation. My contact information is below, however, I'll follow up next week to see if there's interest.

Sincerely,

Sally McIntosh
585.555.1212
smcintosh@ymail.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sallymcintosh/

Sample 2

Dear Ms. Smith:

My former co-worker, Sam Peterson, suggested that I write to you to discuss your accounting department needs and priorities. He speaks highly of ABC Company and your recent industry recognition in Accounting Today, backs this up.

In my most recent role as junior accountant, I oversaw the month-end reporting, accounts payable team and receivables team. I have worked within several different SAP systems and regularly use advanced Excel functionality. Many of the procedural changes I helped implement resulted in a reduced collection period from 65 days to 34 days and overall improved the ease of use and access to reporting.

I'd welcome the opportunity to talk with you about your accounting department needs and will follow up next week to see if you have time for a brief call. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

James Duncan
(585) 555-1212
james.duncan@ymail.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesduncancpa/

Sample 3

Dear Ms. Bowers:

I've been using XYZ's software since it launched in 2010. As an avid user, I can think of nothing better than to be on the inside of a company I so strongly believe in. I've scoured your site and follow your company on social media in hopes of finding an opening in data analysis. Since I haven't seen anything recently, I wanted to reach out and introduce myself.

As a data analyst with BB Bank, I've been focused on building their customer dashboard and translating the millions of data points into information that is easy to monitor. I've used tools like R, SQL and Tableau to manage and present data. I also worked with the project team that launched our new online banking app to ensure the data remained secure.

I'd love to discuss XYZ's data analysis needs and how I may be able to help. Would you be open to meeting with me at your convenience? I'll follow up next week to see if there's time in your schedule. Thank you in advance.

Sincerely,

Marshall Bennett
(585) 555-1212
marshallbennett@ymail.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/mbennett/

Sample 4

This is technically something called an employment proposal, which is very similar to a letter of interest. However, here you are pitching yourself for a role inside a company where there aren't any openings. It may be a role they do not have yet, but based on your research, you think they need. The purpose of this employment proposal is to supply justification for the role, based on your research, and provide clear expectations of what you will do.

Here's an example of an employment proposal written for a customer relations advocate.

Dear Dr. Jones:

RATIONALE: Increase your profits by improving the rate of customers who keep their appointments by having a staff person who will primarily serve the following functions:

  • Create a customer information database and maintain updated records;
  • Contact customers prior to scheduled appointments;
  • Keep customers informed of special sales and events and keep an up-to-date file on each customer and
  • Serve as a customer advocate by inviting feedback about ways to improve and/or expand services.

WHO: I am a self-starter who recently completed a certificate program in clerical administration at XYZ School. I offer strong organizational skills, marketing and customer service experience with a highly cooperative and upbeat attitude.

HOW: I am available 20-30 hours per week, afternoons or evenings, depending on the needs of your business. To perform these duties I'll require access to your data-entry system and if you need me to be onsite, a designated space and phone.

CONDITIONS: I will provide these services for $20.00 an hour for the first three months. If after this period of time you find my work to be as profitable as expected, I will continue as a regular employee for $22.00 an hour.

Thank you in advance for your time and consideration. I would welcome the opportunity to discuss this proposal. I will contact you again early next week to schedule an appointment at your convenience.

Sincerely,

Jane Plain
555-222-1212
jplain@zmail.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/janeplain/

Wrap Up

Writing a letter of interest is a way to proactively pursue or create opportunities that are not publicly posted. While it takes effort to craft an enticing letter, by doing so, you demonstrate your interest.

There will be those job seekers who merely post their resume and hope for a response, but that's not you. You're determined and a go-getter.

What do you have to lose?

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New "Ask VA" portal allows anyone to contact VA securely

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

Do you want to find more information on VA benefits and services? Do you have a question, concern, recommendation, or compliment for VA? Then use the new "Ask VA" portal!

What is Ask VA?

The Ask VA online question portal, launched on October 18, 2021, was created to provide the Veteran community with an easier, faster and more convenient way to get their questions answered. It replaces VA's outdated Inquiry Routing & Information System (IRIS) and the GI Bill Help Portal.

Who Can Access Ask VA?

Anyone can access Ask VA to submit a question at any time. Veterans, their families, caregivers, beneficiaries, dependents, or the general public can use Ask VA for specific or broad information on VA benefits and services. Veterans do not have to be enrolled in VA to submit a question. In fact, Ask VA can provide helpful information for Veterans to enroll and begin their VA journey!

How does Ask VA Work?

After a question or comment is submitted, Ask VA routes it to the best subject matter expert to respond. Users can search for answers by category or specific topics, write their specific question in a free-text box, and indicate how they want to be contacted for an answer — via email, phone or secure VA.gov account.

Since its launch, customers have used Ask VA to ask about their VA claim or appeal status and to send in documentation for their GI Bill benefit.

Use a Secure VA.gov Account to Access all Ask VA Features

Anyone can submit a question as a general user with Ask VA and receive a timely email response. Users also have the option to create or log in to an existing VA.gov account to experience all of Ask VA's features.

Logging in to VA.gov through a secure authentication process allows our Veteran community to safeguard their personal information, send and receive sensitive information, and easily track their questions and answers. Using Ask VA through a secure VA.gov account includes additional benefits, like:

  • Identifying information will be automatically filled in, saving time;
  • Work in progress can be saved to come back to later;
  • Users can add more information to a question they've already submitted or ask a follow-up question to receive information specific to an existing question;
  • Users can receive answers based on preferred method of communication — via email, phone, or secure VA.gov account; and
  • Users can track the status, history and answers to previous questions or conversations.

Using Ask VA by logging in to a secure VA.gov account allows the user to see the history of messages to VA and VA's answers. This allows the user to refer back to helpful information at any time in a single location, and eliminates the hassle of searching through emails or letters or phone messages to find what they need. And users can be updated via email when VA posts new messages to Ask VA.

How to Get a Verified VA.gov Account

To learn more about creating a verified ID.me account, a Premium My HealtheVet account, or a Premium DS Logon account to be able to access all Ask VA's features, click on the links below:

Veterans Asked. Ask VA Answered.

Veterans asked for a simple, intuitive way to interact with VA, and Ask VA was carefully designed to provide that. VA worked with Veterans over several months to refine the Ask VA online experience.

VA's goal is to ensure Ask VA continues to lead the way in modernizing customers' VA experience, incorporating our Veteran community's feedback to best meet their needs and preferences.

Click here to access Ask VA and submit your question online!

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Thank You Email After Job Interview: Tips & Best Samples

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

A job search is like a marathon. And just like a runner in training, you need to develop a regimen, building new habits to help you toward your goal.

Whether you're transitioning out of the military to your first civilian career or hunting for a new challenge, finding a new job — and the right job — is a long-term investment of your time and talent.

Know what you're looking for

Runners set goals, even if it's just finishing the race with a personal best time. The way you search for a job should be no different.

When applying for jobs, it's tempting to apply for any and every job you can find, just throwing your resume out there and hoping something sticks. Instead, focus on the jobs that you really want, the roles that fill you with confidence and excitement.

"What type of job would be ideal for you?" asked Darren Kaltved, a career development expert who shared some job-hunting tips with LinkedIn. "What type of work environment would you thrive in the most? What type of culture and individuals do you see yourself wanting to work with?"

Kaltved noted that the answers to these questions can help you visualize where you want to go with your career and how you should get there.

Customize each application

Runners plan for the terrain they're facing, and bring their best equipment to the race, so bring out the best version of yourself with your resume and cover letter.

It's tempting to build generalized documents — something you can send out to any opening that crosses your path — just to make the application process easier on yourself. However, skimping on the extra effort can hinder your applications.

Indeed recommends that you evaluate your skills and tailor your resume updates to highlight accomplishments and experiences relevant to the application in front of you, and include the keywords from the posted job description in both your resume and cover letter.

"The more your resume reflects the [knowledge, skills, and abilities] being sought, the more likely you are to be qualified by the gatekeeper and referred to the hiring manager for consideration," said James Marfield, associate director of VA's National Recruitment Service. "Make it obvious you are qualified for the job."

Build a community

On the day of the race, it all comes down to you, but runners build communities to help them train, sharing experiences and successes to motivate everyone.

Like running, applying for new jobs is ultimately a solitary endeavor, but knowing other people are going through the same thing can make it easier.

It can help to build a community around you, people who are facing the same challenges and frustrations that you might be experiencing in your search for a new job. With that in mind, many websites and recruiters recommend networking, building relationships with the people in the field you're pursuing.

Connecting with people during the COVID-19 pandemic can be difficult, but career websites like LinkedIn offer options to find people in your field or at companies where you want to apply. Virtual job fairs, too, can be a great way to meet people in your industry and learn more about the jobs they have available.

Stay positive

You might not win the race the first time out, but that's no reason to stop trying.

Only a lucky few won't face rejection in their search for a new career, and you need to be ready to accept the frustrations that come with being passed over.

How you respond next, though, is as important a habit to develop as any other, and it will be the most personal decision you make. Whether you check your resume, check in with your community, or check out for a while, it pays to stay positive and revisit the habits that got you this far.

Remember, it's a marathon, and you have all the tools you need to succeed.

Work at VA

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Win the job search race with these 4 effective habits

By VAntage Point Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

Why You Should Send One

A thank you email after an interview makes a positive impression on hiring decision makers. Here's data to help you understand just how much a thank you note means.

68% of recruiters/hiring managers say a thank you email after the interview matters (Talent Inc.)

And there's another reason to write a thank you after your interview. It's the polite thing to do.

Sending someone a thank you may not be a normal activity for you, but the interviewer did invest their time to meet with you and that is worthy of saying thanks. You are being polite and showing respect.

And there's one final reason to send a thank you. Your note provides you with one more opportunity, perhaps the last one, to remind the interviewer that you are very interested in the job and are indeed the right candidate.

Here are three points you want to address in the thank you letter you send after your interview:

  • Your interest in the role
  • Your fit with the company
  • The value you will deliver if hired

Additionally, sending a thank you helps make you memorable. Believe it or not, very few candidates send them!

When an organization interviews lots of people, it is very easy for them to mix candidates up or forget specifics. Your thank you helps remind them who you are!

How To Write A Thank You Email

As you craft your thank you email or note, keep in mind your format, formality of the language you use, and also summarize your key points concisely. You want to come across as professional, and following the recommendations below will help you accomplish this.

Format

Either use a business letter format (examples below) or if you are using email, be sure to include a meaningful subject line. You'll also want to include an email signature that has your contact information. Use appropriate spacing between paragraphs and use a professional font style with black text.

Greeting/Salutation

"Dear", "Hello", and "Hi" are ways of starting your thank you email. But which do you use? You probably wore a more formal outfit to your interview, so when you address the thank you it's best to keep it formal as well. "Dear" is more formal than "hello". And "hi" is too casual for a thank you email.

Next, you probably wonder if you should use the person's first name or should you use Mr./Ms. Last name? This is a bit trickier. While you want to show respect, you also have started to build a relationship.

Think back to the interview. How did the interviewer introduce themselves? Did they use their first and last name? That's one sign you could use it in your thank you. If the person you are interviewing with is very senior in the organization, you may also want to use the more formal Mr./Mrs Last Name.

Another option you could try is referring to them by their full name. This option is gender neutral and may be a more appropriate way to address your interviewer.

Content

Your post interview thank you email doesn't need to be long. In fact, three paragraphs are all you need. Here's what to put into each section and capture the attention of the reader, your interviewer.

Paragraph 1: The first paragraph should clearly explain why you are writing. And in this case, you are writing to say thank you for the job interview and the interviewer's time.

Paragraph 2: This section of your thank you explains how your specific skills are a match for the job. Using the information you gained from the interview, address several (3-5) of the top qualifications you match.

Consider including why each matching qualification will benefit the company or why you feel a qualification will be of value.

This might also be an opportunity to address any of your areas of weakness during the interview or to improve upon an answer you gave during the interview.

Paragraph 3: The final paragraph emphasizes your gratitude for the interview and opportunity to learn more about the role and organization. Add a final sentence that includes exactly when you will follow up based on the question and answer you got during the interview.

Email vs. Hard Copy

Deciding whether to email your thank you note or send a hard copy thank you letter through the mail isn't about which is easier for you. It's about the impression it will make on the recruiter or hiring manager. Keep in mind that email messages are shorter and considered a bit less formal. It's also easy to delete an email message, meaning it doesn't have the same tangible impact as a hard copy letter.

Another factor to consider when deciding to send your thank you through email or through regular mail is when the company plans to make a decision. (You should ask this question during the interview so you know when to follow up.) If the employer says they'll be making a decision within a day or so, emailing your thank you after the interview is the better option.

Sometimes candidates want to do both. And if you feel like that covers your bases, go for it.

Sending an email immediately following the interview checks the box for getting it done. Go ahead and send a short, well-crafted email thanking the interviewer(s) for their time and indicate that you have mailed them a letter as well.

Just remember, if you do decide to send both, your thank you letter sent through the mail shouldn't be exactly the same as the one you emailed.

Additional Tips & Advice

You can find lots of advice on how to write a thank you email after your interview, but it's important to remember that not all the advice will apply to you. However there is one rule everyone should follow...send it within 24 hours.

You'll find additional recommendations and tips to help you make the best decisions for sending a thank you based on your interview situation.

Everyone Gets A Thank You

Each person you interviewed with should receive a separate thank you email afterward. That's why it's important for you to ask each person for a business card either at the beginning or at the end of the interview.

If you realize you forgot to get their contact information, reach out to your point of contact at the company and ask for the information so you can send a proper thank-you note.

But never send a group "thank you" to everyone who interviewed you. Recall a specific question they asked or customize your message. For example, if you will be working at a peer level, your message might address how you look forward to working alongside them.

As uncommon as it sounds, the people who interviewed you may compare messages.

Send It Within 24 Hours

The best time to send your interview thank you email is while the whole event is still fresh in everyone's mind.

Sending an email within 24 hours allows you to refresh the interviewer's memory and remind them of your strengths.

A more tangible reminder would be to send a slightly modified typed or written note through the mail which means that the interviewer would receive it 2-5 days later.

Sending one or both is fine. But you do need to send it quickly while the company is still considering your candidacy!

Virtual and Phone Interviews Still Deserve A Thank You

Since so many interviews are taking place virtually (either on the phone or on video) you should know that a thank you email is still required. The interviewer still spent time explaining the role, their company and answering your questions.

Sending an email is probably the best way to ensure they see your thank you, as they may not be going into their office.

Handwritten vs. Typed

If you decide to send a hard copy in addition to your email, many career professionals suggest that it should be handwritten to add a personal touch. If you feel you can adequately convey all this information and have presentable handwriting, go ahead and write your thank you note.

However, few people will judge your candidacy based on your handwriting or the fact that you took the extra effort to handwrite a note. What is most important is the message your thank you contains. The decision to handwrite or type your thank you message is up to you. Use what seems most appropriate for your situation.

Bonus

To ensure your thank you email after the interview makes you look like the most qualified and interested candidate, keep these things in mind:

  • Check your writing for spelling and grammar errors
  • Pay special attention to the spelling of the person's name and company name
  • Use good quality thank you notes or paper if you are sending a hard copy
  • Customize your message and details for each and every interview and interviewer
  • Be as specific as possible when it comes to talking about how your skills and qualifications match the job, and why that is of value to the organization
  • Keep it professional and avoid mentioning personal details
  • Provide any information requested, such as references or samples of work, as soon as possible but in a separate email from your thank you.
  • Don't ask about salary, vacations or other benefits in your thank you note. Wait until you have another interview or a job offer before bringing these up if they haven't been discussed already.
Sample Thank You Emails

Personalizing your interview thank you email to address the unique circumstances of each interview is incredibly important. It shows that you were paying attention during the interview and that you are interested in the position with their company.

Here are examples to help you structure your unique follow up after the interview.

Sample #1 — Letter

Date

Name of interviewer
Job Title of interviewer
Company
Street Address
City, State Zip

Dear Ms./Mr. Last Name:

It was wonderful to have the opportunity to speak with you about the [job title] position with [company name], and I thank you. I know how limited a [role of interviewer] time can be, and your timely involvement in the interview process impressed me. After speaking with you, I felt certain that we can develop an effective working relationship.

After reflecting on our discussion, my conclusion is that you are looking for more than just another [job title]; it sounds like you are looking for someone who will pursue opportunities as if it were for their own business. Accountability and autonomy are ingrained in me, and I have the proven experience to back this up. I intend to use not only my dedication in this position but my persistent prospecting and interpersonal skills to convert potential customers into enthusiastic advocates of your service.

If you decide that I should interview with additional team members, I am available at your convenience. Until then, I look forward to the possibility of working with you. I thank you again for taking the time to meet with me.

Sincerely,

Sally Finkel
555.111.2222
sallyfinkel@zmail.com
www.linkin/in/sallyfinkel

Sample #2 — Note

Date of the letter

Dear [Mr./Ms Last Name],

I appreciate your time and the information you shared during our interview on [date] for the [job title] position. I am very interested in this job and in becoming a part of [organization name].

After our conversation, I am even more confident that this is a job I would enjoy, as well as one where I can be successful and make a valuable contribution. My experience as a [occupation/job title] where I [include an accomplishment or work-related process or procedure] would be a strong asset and allow me to have an immediate impact. I am particularly excited about [a particular challenge discussed or responsibility of the job] .

As you continue through the interview process, feel free to contact me If you have any questions. I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you, again, for your time.

Best regards,

[Your full name]
[Your phone number]
[Your email address]

Sample #3 — Email and Hard Copy Combination

Subject line: Thank you for the Project Manager interview

Hello Patricia Smith:

Thank you very much for taking the time to talk with me earlier today. Our conversation about the Project Manager role and ZYT Corps future initiatives was exciting and inspiring.

I feel my previous experience managing similar user experience projects and exceeding customer's expectations would make a valuable impact on the team and to the role. The job sounds exciting, and I think I would be an ideal candidate, thanks to years of experience managing projects with distributed teams.

Thank you again and I look forward to hearing from you after you've completed this week's interviews.

Regards,

Jennifer Jones
444-555-1212
jenniferjones@email.com
www.linkin/in/jennjones

Date

Name of interviewer
Job Title of interviewer
Company
Street Address
City, State Zip

Dear Patricia Smith,

Thank you for taking the time to speak with me about the Project Manager position today. As I mentioned in my email, I enjoyed our conversation and learning about some of the key initiatives ZYT Corporation is working on to enhance your users' online experience. Your commitment to your customers is refreshing and inspiring.

The future goals for the project management team fit very well with my background and my experience leading distributed teams. Additionally, in my last role, our team reconfigured our banking app to increase customer satisfaction by 10%. I strongly believe I could draw from my previous experience to make an immediate impact at ZYT.

Thank you again for your time. If there is any information I can provide that will help in your decision making, please feel free to reach out. I look forward to hearing from you about the next steps in the process.

Sincerely,

Jennifer Jones
jenniferjones@email.com
444-555-1212

Follow Up

When (not if) you don't hear from the company after sending your post interview thank you email, expect to follow up. Don't assume you are no longer in the running. There could be many reasons the company has gone silent. If you are truly interested in the job, follow up weekly until you receive a response. Be polite, respectful and understand that the company, recruiter or hiring manager is not purposefully being rude.

Filling a job often takes longer than anyone expects. Be prepared and persistent. But most importantly, always keep your job search active. Don't stop looking for new jobs until you've landed one!

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