17 Signs Of A Toxic Work Environment (Plus What To Do)

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

It's rare to find a perfect work environment. But if you are looking for a new job, you want to make sure that you move into a work culture that isn't toxic. As a job seeker, be on the lookout for signs of a toxic work environment before and during job interviews. Ask questions of past employees, read employer reviews, and ask open-ended questions during the job interview. If you are employed and feel burned out or stressed all the time, these may be symptoms of working in a toxic work environment. While we all feel some level of stress at work, you want to at least be aware of what is causing your stress. The stress from working in a toxic work culture doesn't just impact you. Your friends and family may notice a change in your behavior and attitude...... Read more

Operation Gratitude 9/11 digital letter writing campaign

By VA Careers | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

On the upcoming 20th anniversary of 9/11 and its designation as a National Day of Service, Operation Gratitude welcomes grateful Americans to express their appreciation for the service and sacrifice of first responders, service members and Veterans through its digital letter writing campaign. Challenge America's Veteran Arts Community (CAVARTS) has created the moving visual art and poetry for this campaign. Please take five minutes to write a letter today through the digital platform here. We have a huge goal of 200,000 letters written through our digital platform by Sept. 12, and need your help to share with your community. The platform is open now and will close at 11:59pm PST on Sept. 12. Here are the two winning designs: This piece was completed in remembrance of the personal loss of my brother, as well... Read more

VA family and caregiver resources

By VAntagePoint Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

Veterans who served in Afghanistan may be experiencing a range of emotions related to the U.S withdrawal from the country, and their families and caregivers face challenges supporting them and may be experiencing their own range of emotions. VA has developed a list of family and caregiver resources, including call center information and community support available to assist during this critical time. Veteran caregivers face unique challenges with little or no medical and mental health training to support themselves and the Veteran in their care. These challenges can take an emotional, financial and physical toll on Veteran caregivers and their families. Supporting others while also coping. Family members of Veterans are currently facing two challenges...... Read more

21 Of The Best Remote Jobs You Can Get In 2021

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Are you tired of the long commute, dressing up in a suit to go to work, or just want more flexibility in your work life? You're a good candidate for remote work. This list of the best remote jobs includes careers that are positioned to grow in the coming years, plus they pay well. In case you didn't know, there's a special vocabulary used to describe jobs that don't require you to work from an office. They are referred to as: remote jobs, telecommuting, work from home, virtual, or distributed work. If you're looking for some of the best remote jobs available today, this list should do the trick. The careers listed pay well, have been growing or have growth potential and many don't require specialized degrees or training. Remote Work On The Rise. The reality is that remote jobs have been around for quite... Read more

Top Three Tasks When Applying for a Security Clearance

By Thomas Braden | U.S. Navy Vet and Author of A Veteran's Guide to Transition: Active Duty to Government Service

WHO NEEDS A SECURITY CLEARANCE? Any person who has worked or will work for an organization that requires access to restricted information more than likely has or will need a security clearance.... Read more

Independent Contractor - Real Value Enterprises - Sarasota - FL
Vibration Analyst - IVC Technologies - Lebanon - OH
C-13-21 Education Assistant - Georgia Public Broadcasting - Atlanta - GA
Government Account Representative - Carahsoft Technology Corporation - Reston - VA
Line Haul Driver CDL A - WSI Transport, Inc - Lebanon - TN
  • A Veteran's Guide to Transition: Active Duty to Government Service

Complete list of Partners

DC/MD/VA Cleared Virtual Hiring Event

December 9, 2021 - Online 2 PM - 5 PM EST

Join the Cleared Careers team as we host a Washington D.C., Maryland, & Virginia Virtual Cleared Hiring Event. Employers will be hiring for their DMV area security clearance opportunities!
Online interviews will be conducted by hiring managers and recruiters via text chat or optional video.
Early registration is recommended to provide the hiring managers and recruiters time to review your resume prior to the event. Employers have the option to review these resumes and send invites to chat with them on the day of the event.

CACI's Foundational Intelligence Rapid Response (FIRR) Virtual Hiring Event

December 9, 2021 - Online 10 AM - 2 PM EST

Propel your career with CACI! We invite you to participate in our CACI's Foundational Intelligence Rapid Response (FIRR) Virtual Hiring Event to speak with our recruiting team and learn about our current opportunities located in Charlottesville, Virginia. When you register, you're signing up to have real-time conversations via chat room settings. We are hiring qualified candidates with a TS/SCI and a background aligning with one of our exciting opportunities. If you're ready to take the leap, we invite you to INVENT YOUR FUTURE with us!

FREE U.S. Veterans Magazine Subscription for TAOnline Members!

U.S. Veterans Magazine (USVM) Is the premiere resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families. USVM is the link between the qualified students, career and business candidates from the ranks of our nation's veteran organizations, educational institutions, corporate America, and the federal government.
Subscribe for FREE today!

17 Signs Of A Toxic Work Environment (Plus What To Do)

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

It's rare to find a perfect work environment. But if you are looking for a new job, you want to make sure that you move into a work culture that isn't toxic.

As a job seeker, be on the lookout for signs of a toxic work environment before and during job interviews. Ask questions of past employees, read employer reviews, and ask open-ended questions during the job interview.

If you are employed and feel burned out or stressed all the time, these may be symptoms of working in a toxic work environment. While we all feel some level of stress at work, you want to at least be aware of what is causing your stress.

The stress from working in a toxic work culture doesn't just impact you. Your friends and family may notice a change in your behavior and attitude. You don't want your stress to spiral out of control and ruin both your work and personal life.

You'll learn what red flags to watch out for so you don't find yourself in a toxic work environment.

Toxic work cultures happen for a variety of reasons — poor leadership, lack of communication, lack of respect, but more importantly, it happens when our psychological safety is threatened.

The Need For Psychological Safety

Symptoms of an unhealthy work setting stem from our need for psychological safety. When employees don't feel valued and respected, they exhibit behaviors that permeate throughout the organization. This results in a toxic work environment.

Psychological safety is "a workplace where one feels that one's voice is welcome with bad news, questions, concerns, half-baked ideas and even mistakes," says Amy Edmondson, Organizational behavioral scientist at Harvard, in CNBC Make It.

Research has proven that organizations with psychological safety see increased confidence, creativity, trust and productivity from their workforce.

So why wouldn't every organization work on this? Creating a work environment where everyone feels heard and respected requires training and development at all levels within the organization — and this takes time as well as money.

Signs Of A Toxic Workplace

Toxic work environments can display themselves in many ways. It's not always as easy as identifying a racist or sexist worker. Sometimes, toxicity takes the form of favoritism, punishments, or dismissive comments.

Sometimes stress and burnout are cyclical or seasonal which isn't necessarily a sign of an unhealthy work environment.

It is up to each job seeker to identify both the obvious and subtle signs of a bad work environment and determine if taking a toxic new job is worth the risk.

Review this toxic workplace checklist to see the behaviors and signs to watch out for.

Lack Of Enthusiasm

One of the ways to see if there's the workplace is toxic is by evaluating the energy and enthusiasm of the employees. If they are dragging themselves into the office from the parking lot, not saying hello or greeting each other or look like they are unhappy, then they probably are not enjoying the workplace. Anyone looking at an unmotivated office feels the vibe of discontent. This is a clear sign of a toxic work environment.

Employees Feel Left Out Of Communication Loop

When employees don't know what's going on, they fill the void of information with rumors. If an employee doesn't have the most current information, they may miss a deadline and get reprimanded by their manager. Inefficient communication is not only demoralizing, it can endanger the health and safety of employees. Organizations with poor communication strategies are a sign of a negative work environment.

Work Deadlines Take Priority Over Emotional Well-being

When results are more valued than the people, it leads to employees feeling they are disposable or not important. This shows a disregard for the personal needs of employees. Whether it is ignoring the importance of work/life balance or lack of sensitivity to family or personal situations, employers who don't show empathy and put their people first risk earning the reputation of a toxic workplace.

Technology Gets In The Way Of Getting Things Done

It could be that the organization's technology is outdated or not everyone knows how to use the new technology yet. In either case, when technology gets in the way of getting things done, it's a sign that the organization may not be investing in making their business better. You may also hear the excuse "that's the way it's always been done." Watch out for this sign that the company is not adjusting and adapting.

Leaders Are Invisible

An invisible leader is not leading. They may not be reinforcing the values of the organization or are not communicating their vision. When leadership, at any level, is not visible, not communicating or not leading, it leaves employees feeling alone, disconnected and vulnerable.

Confusion And/Or Dysfunction

When employees don't know what's going on or hear mixed messages about plans, this leads to confusion. Dysfunction can also happen when roles are unclear or there are sudden changes with no clear goals. A work environment that lacks trust has ineffective communication, or is dealing with power struggles is certainly not healthy.

Unfair Policies & Unequal Enforcement of Policies

Morale will suffer if employees feel policies are unfair or that they are being treated unfairly. This can be the "star" employee who can do no wrong or it could be a woman who feels her sexual harassment claims are being ignored. Without fair policies or an inclusive work environment, it's easy for a toxic work culture to form.

Employees Stop Caring About Their Work

When an employee regularly misses deadlines or flat out refuses to deliver and this goes undisciplined or unreported, it creates an unhealthy workplace. Employees seldom start a job lacking motivation. It happens over time. Unhappy workers become apathetic employees and it's a sign of an unhealthy working environment.

Your Boss Is Never Around When Needed

It's frustrating when you need to ask your boss a question and they aren't around or haven't responded to your emails and texts. Employees who try turning to their boss for help but don't get a response become discouraged by the lack of communication. They feel like their boss doesn't have their back or doesn't care about them. And this leads to fatigue, burnout and stress which are all symptoms of a negative work environment.

Growth Or Learning Is Stifled

You want to take on greater responsibility or get experience using new skills but you're turned down or delayed. When you're turned down or denied the opportunity to grow or learn new things it's difficult to feel engaged. When you are unable to achieve career goals or fulfill personal values it can lead to dissatisfaction with your job. This can also result in unhealthy work behaviors.

Gossip, Backstabbing & Exclusion

An organization filled with gossiping employees is not a healthy work environment. When not addressed, this chatter can lead to exclusion and even backstabbing and bullying in some circumstances. Be on the lookout for an organization full of gossipers.

High Employee Turnover

A sure sign things are not good inside an organization is high turnover. People don't stay in a job very long if they are miserable. It could be any combination of toxic work behaviors that result in employees leaving. It may be poor leadership that fires instead of fixing problems.

Absenteeism

Working in a toxic environment leads to stress and stress causes illness. Absenteeism is a result of sick, dissatisfied or unmotivated workers. Either you know it first-hand or can see this is a pattern in the organization.

Conflict With Your Ethics Or Values

Have you ever been asked to do something borderline unethical? Maybe you've been commanded to fudge numbers or lie to a client. When employees feel that their values or ethics are being challenged, it's hard to want to do their best work. Poor leadership is the primary cause, but this can trickle down to employees.

Lack of Feedback

No feedback or negative feedback leads workers to doubt their abilities. They're less likely to innovate or suggest new ideas. And employees who don't get feedback will be hesitant to put forth the effort to do their jobs. A breakdown in timely, honest communication erodes employees

Fear of Failure

If you notice employees not taking risks, it's probably because they were reprimanded or criticized for failing. In a work culture that doesn't embrace failure, it is seen instead as a flaw, there is little incentive for employees to try new things or even suggest trying new things.

Can't Sleep Or Get Out Of Bed In The Morning

Are you regularly having difficulty sleeping? Pay attention. If this continues beyond an initial stressful event, it's your body's way of saying you need to make a change.

What You Can Do About It

You have two choices when it comes to a toxic work environment, stay or leave.

If you choose to stay, you will either have to ignore the toxicity or confront it.

For many, the thought of confronting a toxic boss is not something they are willing to do. If you are up for the challenge because you want to make your work situation more tolerable, here are some suggestions.

Tips For Fixing Toxic Behavior

I've always believed in trying to address a problem directly before going up the chain of command. There may be exceptions but in most cases, it's worth trying as a first step. I also think every employee can follow the rule: "see something, say something."

No matter what your level of authority, you have the right to address unhealthy behaviors that contribute to toxic work environments.

  • Offer to deliver training or create instructions on new technology
  • Suggest leaders communicate more often
  • Discuss your needs and goals with your manager
  • Address your manager's communication or behaviors and how they impact your work
  • Talk to HR about updating policies to be more inclusive
  • Put a stop to the gossip
  • Model the behavior you expect from others
  • Tell a coworker when their words are offensive/not appreciated/inappropriate
  • Show co-workers you care (offer help or offer to listen)
  • It is easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission. Take a risk.
  • Offer to be a mentor
Leave If You Must

Once you've weighed the pros and cons of staying in a toxic job, you may decide to leave.

How soon depends on how badly you need a job and paycheck. Always try to have a job lined up first. It's always easier to find a job when you have one. If you absolutely can't last another day and need to quit, realize it could take 6-9 months (sometimes longer) to secure a new job.

Learn what to do when you're in a job you hate.

A Good Workplace Is Hard To Find

A workplace where empathy, feedback, and clear goals have been set and are on full display is hard to find. That's why it's important to recognize some of the red flags of a toxic work environment — so you make the right choice and find a job and company where you'll be happy.

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Operation Gratitude 9/11 digital letter writing campaign

By VA Careers | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

On the upcoming 20th anniversary of 9/11 and its designation as a National Day of Service, Operation Gratitude welcomes grateful Americans to express their appreciation for the service and sacrifice of first responders, service members and Veterans through its digital letter writing campaign. Challenge America's Veteran Arts Community (CAVARTS) has created the moving visual art and poetry for this campaign.

Please take five minutes to write a letter today through the digital platform here.

We have a huge goal of 200,000 letters written through our digital platform by Sept. 12, and need your help to share with your community.

The platform is open now and will close at 11:59pm PST on Sept. 12.

Here are the two winning designs:

man holding dog tags in his hand operation gratitude digital letter campaign
Mindful, a painting by Veteran and artist Jason Turner.
a sonnet written by Veteran Douglas Johnson operation gratitude digital letter campaign
9/11/2021 Sonnet by Douglas W. Johnson

This piece was completed in remembrance of the personal loss of my brother, as well as my brothers and sisters in arms and friends lost while serving during 9/11 and after. Their memories continue to flood my thoughts. I wanted to create an image that signified that. That period of my life will always weigh heavily on me. However, there's always someone thinking about you, and they have your six.

We disagreed, and still disagree, whether being overseas had any point. We never disagreed on whether our sacrifices, and those who went before us, had meaning.

The words we use sound so cliche, so trite, but the deeds that we try to describe are so poignant and fraught with emotion that we keep seeking ways to make the words evoke the memory of the day we beheld the heroic humans. We are not all called to greatness, but we can all live so that one day it may be said of us, "This, too, was humanity". The heroes of 9/11 led the way for the heroes of OIF and OEF who followed.

Those who wish to view the art online may visit the Challenge America blog: challengeamerica.com/blog.

Please take 5 minutes to write a letter today through our digital platform here.

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA.

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VA family and caregiver resources

By VAntagePoint Contributor | VAntage Point Contributor © 2021, Reprinted with permission

Veterans who served in Afghanistan may be experiencing a range of emotions related to the U.S withdrawal from the country, and their families and caregivers face challenges supporting them and may be experiencing their own range of emotions. VA has developed a list of family and caregiver resources, including call center information and community support available to assist during this critical time.

Veteran caregivers face unique challenges with little or no medical and mental health training to support themselves and the Veteran in their care. These challenges can take an emotional, financial and physical toll on Veteran caregivers and their families.

Supporting others while also coping

Family members of Veterans are currently facing two challenges — supporting the Veteran they love, and coping with their own thoughts and feelings. VA has resources and information for both of these challenges, like Coaching into Care, which provides support and resources to families who don't know where to start in supporting the Veteran they love, all the way to VA's Caregiver Support Program that connects caregivers to one another to support each other as peers.

"The most important thing we can do right now is connect. Talk to other families facing similar challenges, even families you haven't reached out to in a while. Suggest that your Veteran reach out to some of their battle buddies. Access one of the many resources available through VA, DOD, or any of our many partners. You are not alone, and you do not need to face any of this alone."
Federal Veteran Caregiver Resources

VA Caregiver Support Resources:

Building Better Caregiversva.buildingbettercaregivers.org

  • Online workshop with 6 weekly self-paced lessons, facilitator guidance, group support and access to an alumni community for program graduates.

Coaching into Care: Call 1-888-823-7458

Coaching Into Care helps loved ones help Veterans | VAntage Point

Coaching Into Care — MIRECC / CoE (va.gov)

  • Coaching Into Care is a free service for people who are concerned about the Veterans in their lives. Licensed psychologists and social workers offer advice for starting the conversation with a Veteran about their mental health and motivating them to seek treatment if it's needed.

Vet Centers: Call 1-877-WAR-VETS

Vet Centers (Readjustment Counseling) Home (va.gov)

  • Vet Centers are community-based counseling centers that provide a wide range of social and psychological services, including professional readjustment counseling to eligible Veterans, active duty service members, including National Guard and Reserve components, and their families.

Survivors Assistance:

VA Welcome Kit and Quick Start Guide for Caregivers: va.gov/welcome-kit/

VA.GOV: Access and manage your VA benefits and health care, including education and records va.gov.

MyVA411: Dial 1-855-948-2311 (1-800-MyVA411). Callers have the option of pressing 0 to be immediately connected with a customer service agent to answer questions.

Veterans Crisis Line: Dial 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1 to talk to someone. Send a text message to 838255 to connect with a VA responder. Start a confidential online chat session at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat.

#VetResources: VA newsletter reaching more than 11 million Veterans, families, caregivers and survivors. Resources, tools and tips for VA and community resources. Subscribe at va.gov/vetresources/.

Coronavirus Information:

Department of Defense Caregiver Support Directory lists national resources and programs that assist military caregivers, including helplines, training, caregiver support programs, financial support, and support for children's needs. The directory is a free resource available for download. The DoD also offers peer forums and discussion groups for caregivers.

Department of Health and Human Services, Administration of Community Living (HHS ACL): acl.gov.

Community Veteran Caregiver Resources

VA will continue to support our families and caregivers and share resources from VA and the community.

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on the part of VA.

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21 Of The Best Remote Jobs You Can Get In 2021

By Hannah Morgan | Career Sherpa - Reprinted with permission

Are you tired of the long commute, dressing up in a suit to go to work, or just want more flexibility in your work life? You're a good candidate for remote work.

This list of the best remote jobs includes careers that are positioned to grow in the coming years, plus they pay well.

In case you didn't know, there's a special vocabulary used to describe jobs that don't require you to work from an office. They are referred to as: remote jobs, telecommuting, work from home, virtual, or distributed work.

If you're looking for some of the best remote jobs available today, this list should do the trick. The careers listed pay well, have been growing or have growth potential and many don't require specialized degrees or training.

Remote Work On The Rise

The reality is that remote jobs have been around for quite a while and the number of remote workers has steadily been growing due to advancements in technology that allows workers to access information remotely and collaborate in real-time.

About 17% of the US workforce were full-time remote workers before the pandemic and 44% worked remotely full-time during the pandemic

according to Statista

While the number of remote workers is expected to decrease slightly, the trend of remote work isn't going away.

Benefits Of Remote Work

Those who work remotely appreciate a more flexible work schedule, the ability to work from any location, not having to commute and being able to spend time with their family.

Many workers have reclaimed hours in their day by not commuting. There's also the money saved by not needing to buy work clothes and not having to pay for gas, parking, or transportation.

According to a joint survey by Buffer,

97.6% said they would like to work remotely, at least part of the time, for the rest of their careers.

Remote workers have come to enjoy the benefits of working remotely and are not willing to give that up easily.

Remote Jobs, Not Freelance

When looking for remote jobs, you used to come across jobs geared towards self-employed freelancers or gig workers. Not so today.

Remote jobs aren't just for freelancers anymore. Remote work opportunities are found in many industries and in a wide variety of roles making remote jobs suitable to anyone. Plus the top remote jobs offer regular pay, health insurance and benefits, without needing to hustle for your next gig.

The Best Remote Careers Are Not Scams

It used to be that many remote jobs were scams. They were called "work from home" jobs and they targeted stay-at-home parents or people looking to make extra cash. Today's remote jobs are mostly legitimate opportunities. Though you still need to be cautious and do your due diligence (this is true for any job posting today).

We've seen more employers realize that a remote workforce is productive. While there are still challenges managing a distributed team, some companies have better systems and processes in place to manage remote workers.

Is Remote Work Right For Me?

Working from home can be lonely. It can also be chaotic if you don't have a plan for young kids. It also requires discipline.

That means even if you're able to pursue one of the best remote jobs, it's important to ask yourself these questions before jumping on the bandwagon.

  • Do I need social interaction in my workday?
  • Do I communicate proactively and thoroughly?
  • Do I manage my time and priorities effectively?
  • Can I stay focused on work in my home environment?

Working remotely requires you to be more proactive in getting answers to your questions and solving problems. You'll also need a plan on how and when you'll communicate with your boss to make sure your work is on track and your boss knows what you've accomplished.

The Best Remote Jobs

According to Ladders, these 10 careers are the best (and highest-paying) remote work jobs in 2021:

  • Marketing, media and design (974% remote-work growth)
  • Project and program management (801%)
  • Accounting and finance (750%)
  • Human resources and legal (546%)
  • Technology (521%)
  • Engineering and construction (410%)
  • Operations and general management (299%)
  • Science and education (276%)
  • Sales and business development (211%)
  • Health care (197%)

Let's dive in and look at the top remote jobs within these careers.

Marketing, Media & Design

Careers within marketing, media and design are well suited for remote work. They require creative thinking and typically the work is done independently.

Digital Marketing Specialist
  • Skills: Product Marketing, Digital Strategy, Brand Management
  • Education: 94% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $48,000 — $96,000

Digital marketing specialists' objectives are to increase brand awareness, promote company products or services and drive prospects to conversions. Unlike using the more traditional marketing channels, digital marketers communicate through various technology platforms. Digital marketing specialists work to initiate effective marketing campaigns online and to translate business goals into successful marketing campaigns.

Additional remote jobs in this area include: Social Media Manager, Marketing Representative, and Search Engine Optimization Specialist.

Digital Content Creator
  • Skills: Video Editing, Creative Writing, Public Speaking
  • Education: 92% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $46,000 — $62,400

Digital content creators write blog posts, create website copy, plan and coordinate podcasts and even create short videos for social media. Some of the remote job titles used may also include: Content Coordinator, Writing Consultant, Podcaster, and Blogger. Given the rise in the consumption of online information, these roles are fundamental to brand building and a business's marketing success.

Graphic Designer
  • Skills: Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Branding, Desktop Publishing
  • Salary Range: $34,000 — $65,000

Skilled graphic designers are always in demand, and with more people than ever buying online and interacting digitally, the value of a well-designed, easy to navigate, and responsive company website has never been higher. Graphic design roles that focus on user experience and user interface (UI/UX designers) work together with programmers to design user experiences and help customers communicate with digital products.

Project & Program Management

Many project and program management jobs are becoming virtual or remote due to project management software and tools.

Project Manager
  • Skills: Time Management, Scheduling, Communication, Budgeting
  • Salary Range: $61,000 — $134,000

Project managers initiate, design, plan, execute, monitor and complete projects. They manage teams, facilitate commitment and motivate team members, manage the expectations of key stakeholders and communicate the status of project milestones. They build a comprehensive work plan and manage the budget for projects. Project management roles in the software industry look different than project management in the finance industry. Therefore, you will need experience in your desired industry.

Product Manager
  • Skills: Market research, Critical thinking and analytical skills, prototyping
  • Salary Range: $54,000 — $121,000

Product managers handle the process of developing products and solutions. Setting strategy, creating road maps, and defining product features are all a part of the job. Product managers may also analyze market conditions and communicate with people at all levels of an organization.

Accounting & Finance

Careers in accounting and finance are becoming more easily accessible remotely due to technology.

Accountant
  • Skills: General Ledger, Financial Reporting, Accounts Payable, Microsoft Excel
  • Salary Range: $41,000 — $71,000

Accountants review and prepare financial accounts and documents for individuals and businesses. They also ensure that a company is financially sustainable based on its budget and operating expenses and may even provide financial advice. Accountants can work remotely in entry-level and senior positions and have high growth potential.

Financial Analyst
  • Skills: Data analysis, Microsoft Excel, Financial analysis, Financial modeling
  • Salary Range: $48,000 — $83,000

Financial analysts use their expertise to inform a company's financial decision-making process by conducting deep analysis of the variables that impact business operations. The exact responsibilities will depend on the specific remote job and the context of its industry. These professionals work in corporate offices, in financial analyst firms, or as private practicing analysts.

Mortgage Loan Officer
  • Skills: Risk Management, Customer Service, Credit Analysis
  • Education: 86% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $43,700 — $60,000

Loan officers evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of loan applications. Most loan officers are employed by commercial banks, credit unions, mortgage companies, and other financial institutions. Additional related jobs positioned for growth include: Underwriter, Escrow Officer and Loan Closer.

Human Resources & Legal

HR and legal careers serve as the backbone of every business. These vital functions are too important to be limited to working in the office.

Recruiter
  • Skills: Data analysis, project management, sourcing.
  • Salary Range: $36,000 — $80,000

Recruiters evaluate candidates' strengths compared with clients' requirements, and recommend the best candidates to clients after a detailed screening and/or skill assessment. They must be good at identifying talent and persuading people to interview with a particular company. Recruiters may work for a single company or for multiple companies at once as an independent contractor.

Compliance & Privacy Officer
  • Skills: Regulatory Compliance, internal audit,
  • Education: 87% have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $50,000 — $138,000

Privacy officers ensure companies follow best privacy practices and procedures. Tasks can include performing audits to ensure privacy compliance, conducting risk assessments and reduction strategies, and handling breaches and privacy issues. A degree in a technical field is often required.

Technology

Businesses will always need to adapt to new technology, which changes rapidly. Remote jobs and careers within this field are constantly growing.

Cyber Security Analyst
  • Skills: Analytical, Communication and collaboration, Information technology knowledge
  • Salary Range: $51,000 — $117,000

The role of cybersecurity analysts is to protect computer networks and systems at a company. Analysts will monitor networks for security breaches, research IT trends, create plans for possible security issues, and more. Many cybersecurity analyst roles require experience with IT work.

Web Developer
  • Skills: Program Management, Web Development, Distributed Systems
  • Education: 93% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $77,500 — $104,000

Web developers build the structure of websites by working with designers and content producers to write and modify software for websites. They write code to access databases as well as test and document software. Additional remote jobs include Full Stack Engineer, Frontend Developer, and Game Developer.

User Experience Designer
  • Skills: Web Design, Design Thinking, User Experience Testing
  • Education: 97% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $80,000 — $103,000

User Experience Designers (UX designers) create designs for end users that are attractive and functional; they need to make unified designs that are accessible to the target population. In addition, these designers are in charge of the design process from the mockup stage to the final product, whether it is a poster or a software application. Industrial design concepts are needed to create prototypes and simple, clean designs.

Similar remote roles that are growing include, Product Design Consultant, User Interface Designer, and User Experience Researcher.

Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning
  • Skills: Advanced math and statistics skills, Neural networks, C++, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Python, TensorFlow
  • Education: 99% have a masters or bachelor's degree.
  • Salary Range: $124,000 — $150,000

Machine Learning Engineers work in Information Technology to research, build and design self-running artificial intelligence (AI) systems to automate predictive models. They design and create the AI algorithms capable of learning and making predictions that define machine learning. Additional roles include: Machine Learning Research, Machine Learning Engineer and Artificial Intelligence Specialist. ML engineers usually work closely with data scientists to construct artificial intelligence systems and machine learning.

Data Scientist
  • Skills: TensorFlow, Statistical Modeling, Data Visualization
  • Education: 98% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $100,000 — $130,000

Since data is vital to every business, you can find data scientists in almost every industry. Similar remote jobs include: Data Science Specialist and Data Management Analyst. Data scientists partner closely with business stakeholders to understand goals and determine how data can be used to achieve those goals. They design data modeling processes, create algorithms and predictive models to extract the data the business needs, and help analyze the data and share insights with those who want and need it.

Education

Helping students learn and bridging gaps in knowledge is now even easier using video technology. From elementary level to training business, education is a growing area for remote opportunities.

Career Coach
  • Skills: Mentoring, Social Media, Entrepreneurship
  • Education: 92% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $44,300 — $50,000

Career, life and business coaches provide guidance to help their clients transform. These roles can be performed through a business or as an independent business. You can find Life Coaches, Fitness Coaches and Business Coaches offering services online and virtually. The main responsibility of a life coach is to help people who want to lead healthier lifestyles and improve both their physical and psychological well-being. Fitness coaches focus on physical wellness and business coaches guide a business owner in running a business by helping them clarify the vision of their business and how it fits in with their personal goals.

Tutors
  • Skills: Lesson planning/curriculum design, Education platform development, engineering and design
  • Education: 96% of hires have a bachelor's degree or higher
  • Salary Range: $46,500 — $63,200

This is one of the best remote jobs out there, and also one of the most underrated. Remote tutors work with students of any age. Subjects can vary from elementary-level history or English as a second language to physics. Video streaming software and teaching software are often used to deliver tutoring in either one-on-one or in group settings. Some tutors create their own lesson plans, while others teach from a specific program. Within education, you can also find remote roles such as Education Consultants and Teaching Assistants.

Sales & Business Development

Sales careers are vital to the growth of every business. While sales careers have often required working in the field, other roles are now open to remote work too.

Business Development Manager
  • Skills: Account Management, Leadership, Marketing, Sales, Sales Management
  • Education: 52% have Bachelors degree
  • Salary Range: $44,000 — $122,000

Business development managers create business plans, identify where to find new clients, manage accounts, and meet sales goals. Sales and selling skills are key elements of this job, as well as maintaining business relationships.

Senior Account Manager
  • Skills: Account Management,
  • Salary Range: $49,000 — $110,000

Account managers maintain client accounts by managing the relationship with customers and creating long-term relationships, understanding client needs, handling client communications, generating sales, and more. A senior-level role may require 10 or more years of experience.

Health Care

Health care impacts all of us and careers in health care don't necessarily require interacting with patients.

Clinical Trial Manager
  • Skills: Clinical Research, Project Management,
  • Education: Bachelor's degree (business, health care management or biology) or higher
  • Salary Range: $65,000 — $131,000

This job involves managing clinical trials. Some duties include recruiting patients for trials, ensuring trials run smoothly, reviewing trial results, ensuring safety standards compliance, and making changes to the trial structure. They also analyze data based on trial results, interpreting research information, and creating detailed documentation. Clinical trial managers must have strong medical knowledge, along with appropriate schooling

Medical Writer
  • Skills: Writing Procedures & Documentation, technical writing,
  • Salary Range: $53,000 — $103,000

Medical writers take technical and scientific data from studies and research to write papers, articles, and documents that present the information in a clear manner. They usually work at a pharmaceutical company, health services provider, medical equipment company, or a related organization. They may also write manuals, training materials, or educational papers. Knowledge of medical terms and processes is required, and certification with the American Medical Writers Association can be a bonus.

 

Data and job lists come from LinkedIn, FlexJobs, Payscale

 

How To Find Remote Jobs

When looking for remote work, it's as simple as using the "remote" filter on your favorite job board. Almost every job board gives you the option to search for "remote" jobs. If you are looking for vetted employers with remote opportunities, you can use a site like FlexJobs.com. You can also check out Best Websites for Remote Work and Side Gigs.

What's The Best Remote Job For You?

To find the best remote job, start by assessing your skills, career goals and salary requirements to determine which remote careers are the right fit for your situation. There's a very good chance you will find exactly the right opportunity.

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Top Three Tasks When Applying for a Security Clearance

By Thomas Braden | U.S. Navy Vet and Author of A Veteran's Guide to Transition: Active Duty to Government Service

As the result of Congressional legislation and Presidential Executive Orders, all federal positions which require a security clearance, have their background investigations completed by the Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency (DCSA) in Quantico, VA. Their website is a wealth of information and is available, here: dcsa.mil

By all pre-COVID accounts, the federal government's reorganization of a variety of agencies and entities under DCSA's leadership has been a success. By streamlining and expediting the process, DCSA has reduced a huge backlog of almost 200,000 pending cases. Despite the many successes in this reorganization, the average processing time still exceeds 3-4 months.

So, what can you do to avoid delays in your processing? You can ensure the following:

Be organized

When you begin your background investigation and have to complete the perquisite SF-86 via the Electronic Questionnaires for Investigations Processing (e-QIP) system, you need to be well-organized. If you've done this before, the system may have retained your information. If not, you will be starting from scratch and need to have your facts in order. You will need to outline your entire family history including dates of birth and current addresses. That may sound easy, of course you know Mom's birthday... but what year? And you will even need to provide this information for your outlaws... I meant, in-laws and extended family (again, including place and date of birth and yes, dates of death, too.)

You will need to provide data reaching back as far as ten years, including addresses, foreign travel/contacts, etc. I recommend that you have a copy of your credit report on hand, as it will likely contain useful information. For each period of employment and/or residence, you will also need to provide a current U.S. based point of contact who can vouch for you during that time; such as a neighbor, co-worker or boss. You will need full names, as well as valid phone numbers and email addresses. This is time consuming and may involve some sleuthing on your part to track them down today. (You may want to find them on Facebook of Linked In and give them a head's up, as well.)

Also, men will be required to provide verification of their registration for the Selective Service (aka, "the draft.") Fortunately, you can look up your registration number: sss.gov/verify

Get finger-printed, properly

According to DCSA, the next biggest reason which causes delays in the completion of your background investigation is finger-printing. Yeah, this one surprised me as well, but it can be major hiccup in your processing. I had previously had a security clearance (with finger-prints on the record) for more than 25 years, but none of that mattered... I needed to get a new set of finger-prints and they needed to be collected electronically. Luckily, I was located near Washington, D.C. and was able to get this task completed on one of the military bases. If I wasn't retired (and therefore had access to the base), I'm not exactly sure how I would have completed this task. So, think that part through, you may need to be escorted onto a DoD installation, or you may need to find a civilian police station that is willing to do it. You'll also need to verify if your organization and level of clearance requires submission via the same DoD electronic system, or will they accept the tradition rolled/hard copy prints. I would certainly run these requirements to ground, early-on in the process with your Human Resources Office (HRO) and/or Security Office.

Be honest

Another reason which causes delays when completing your background investigation is extensive foreign travel and/or undisclosed foreign contacts, and foreign investments which the DCSA investigators will need to exert time and resources chasing down. If you've lived or served overseas, this can be an issue. You will need to provide all dates of foreign travel. I recommend checking your passport and Facebook, Instagram or other social media for pictures you or your family may have posted. (If you haven't lived overseas, this may sound ridiculous, but it's easy to forget that day trip across the border....) You will also need to identify if that travel was for work or pleasure. (At some point it gets compared to the actual travel they find with your passport; so, it's best if you include everything.) Lastly, you will need to disclose any foreign contacts that you had or maintained during those times. This could be your landlord, a co-worker, or your maid/gardener. My advice is to provide as much information as you possibly can; again, including any known contact information that you may have for these foreign contacts. If they're just that, casual acquaintances, you should be fine; however, if they're considered "close and/or continuous" you have to provide additional information. This is particularly true if your spouse is/was a foreign national and perhaps maintains a house or other foreign investment. So, be honest, be prepared and come to this process ready to disclose everything.

If you follow these rules

So, if I follow these three rules will I be guaranteed to obtain my security clearance?

No, there never any guarantees, but you should help in speeding up the timeline for DCSA to make an adjudication/determination.

The Adjudicative Guidelines for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Information are used by DoD Central Adjudication Facilities (DoDCAF) to determine both initial and continued eligibility for access to classified information. The adjudication process is an examination of a sufficient period of a person's life to make an affirmative determination that the person is an acceptable security risk. Eligibility for access to classified information is predicated upon the individual meeting these personnel security guidelines. The adjudication process is the careful weighing of a number of variables known as the whole-person concept. All available, reliable information about the person, past and present, favorable and unfavorable, is considered in reaching a clearance determination. When an individual's life history shows evidence of unreliability or untrustworthiness, questions arise whether the individual can be relied on and trusted to exercise the responsibility necessary for working in a secure environment where protection of classified information is paramount.

But if you follow the guidelines above: Be Organized; Get the finger-prints correct; and, Be Honest. You should be well on your way to a streamlined adjudication process.

I cover this - and so much more - in greater depth and detail throughout my book, A Veteran's Guide to Transition: Active Duty to Government Service, now available on Amazon for less than the cost of a cup of coffee, I might add! https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08Z83W9BK/

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